Windover Hill, The South Downs (5) Location map
 
  View of the Wilmington Long Man from Windover Hill, Sussex, England   The South Downs.

Approaching the Wilmington Long Man (the funny white sqiggles in the rather heavy shadow) on the slopes of Windover Hill from just above the level of his head.

The village of Wilmington is out of the picture to the left.

 

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  Photo of the view from Windover Hill, Sussex, England   The South Downs.

This view is from the top of Windover Hill looking south to the coast. There are, of course, the inevitable sheep.

 

 

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  View of the South Downs Way on Windover Hill, Sussex, England   The South Downs.

This shows part of the South Downs Way on the top of Windover Hill and the letters arranged vertically on the marker post are S D W (South Downs Way). You may notice that there isn't much evidence of a path except that to the right of the post there is a strip of grass, running away from the camera, which is a slightly different colour from the surrounding grassland.

This part of the path, on the top of the hill in open grassland, is not particularly distinct but there is, at least, the occasional marker post to convince you that you are on the path.

 

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  View of Eastbourne and the coast from Windover Hill, Sussex, England   The South Downs.

This view is south from just below the top of Windover Hill, on the eastern side, and shows Eastbourne and the sea in the distance with just the briefest of glimpses of the white chalk cliffs in the centre of the horizon.

The village of Jevington is down in the valley just a short way from this point.

 

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  View of the path across Lullington Heath near Windover Hill, Sussex, England   The South Downs.

This is part of the path back from Jevington to Litlington across Lullington Heath running east to west.

Lullington Heath is unusual in that heathland is found on acid soil and the underlying rock here is alkaline (chalk) but, by the remotest of chances, acid soil has been deposited on the chalk allowing acid loving plants to grow here.

You can see just how thin the soil veneer is here where it has been worn down to the chalk on the path.

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